Significance of Mahashivratri

Mahashivratri
is one of the biggest and most significant among the sacred festival nights of India. This – the darkest night of the year – celebrates the Grace of Shiva, who is considered the Adi guru or the First guru, from whom the yogic tradition originates. The planetary positions on this night are such that there is a powerful natural upsurge of energy in the human system. It is enormously beneficial for one’s physical and spiritual wellbeing to stay awake and aware in a vertical position throughout the night.


Mahashivratri
is significant for people on the yogic path not only because of the natural support from nature, but also the opportunity for coming together for sadhana (spiritual practices). This is also a chance for people in family situations to take time off from mundane activities make use of the yogic processes for their own fulfillment and wellbeing. Like all Indian festivals, Mahashivratri is full of music, dance, and exuberant color. Not merely a night long celebration, Mahashivratri is an opportunity to soak in Shiva’s Grace and the possibility to experience something of the beyond.




Who is Shiva? A mythological God or a being that walked the Earth? Why is he so significant to people on the spiritual path and what is the symbolism surrounding the persona that we call ‘Shiva’?